UCookbook: Cranked-up apple pie crepes

Finished plate of apple cinnamon crepes

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It’s October, and if you’re anything like we are, you’ve been knee-deep in pumpkin for weeks. But there are other stars of the season, and they too come in the form of fruit. (Yup, you heard it here—pumpkins are fruit. Mind blown much? Same.) Of course, we’re talking about apples, which inevitably means we’re talking about pie. Our variation gets a high-class twist from replacing the crust with a crepe, so you get more fruit, less sugar, and a new cooking skill from the deal. These are apple pie crepes, and you’re about to be amazed. Let’s get started.

Filling

  • 3 large apples (tart varieties—e.g., Cortland, McIntosh, and Granny Smith work best here, but you do you)
  • 2 tablespoons brown sugar
  • ½ tablespoon cinnamon 

Crepes

  • 1 egg
  • 1 1⁄3 cup whole-wheat flour
  • 2 cups milk (nondairy works, if you’d rather)
  • 1 tablespoon vegetable oil
  • ½ teaspoon baking powder
  • 2 tablespoons sugar

Filling

  1. Peel the apples and chop them into bite-sized pieces.
  2. Combine apples, brown sugar, and cinnamon in a bowl and stir until evenly distributed.
  3. Let the flavors blend and turn into apple-syrupy goodness while you prepare the crepes.

Crepes

  1. Mix all ingredients together in a bowl with a whisk until the mixture is smooth.
  2. Grease a small skillet and put it over medium heat. Thinly coat the pan with crepe batter until the bottom of the pan is covered.
  3. Flip the crepe over with a spatula, tongs, or a fork once the crepe batter starts to bubble (roughly 1 ½ minutes).
  4. Remove from heat roughly 1 minute after flipping and stack the crepes up on a plate as you go. Repeat until the mixture runs out, your arm gets tired, or you’re too hungry to carry on. (Hopefully, these happen at the same time.)
  5. Microwave the filling for 30–45 seconds.
  6. Create a crepe: Grab one, fill it with the apple mixture, roll up, breathe in the sweet scent of pie, and enjoy the domestic bliss you just created.

Chopped apples mixed with cinnamon and brown sugar

This healthier, more convenient twist on pie puts the focus on the fruit, so you’re eating more apples and less sugar. Apples are healthy for all sorts of reasons—they’re filled with fiber and Vitamin C. The crepe itself has egg and whole-wheat flour for a bit of protein and a lot of enjoyment. You fancy.

Crepe ingredients whisked in large bowl

Crepe with visible bubbles being flipped in pan

Open crepe lined with apple filling

Prepared and photographed by Joanna Carmona

Recipe adapted from
http://juliasalbum.com/2013/06/apple-cinnamon-crepes-recipe/

Recipe review

Shane Curry photoShane C., third-year student, University of Victoria, British Columbia

“Dessert doesn’t always mean lapsing into a sugar coma; sometimes apples and cinnamon are just what your sweet tooth needs. Apple crepes are a nice change from heavier, sweeter desserts like vanilla ice cream or chocolate pudding. These just have a few ingredients, with nothing too heavy. Plus the smell of apples, brown sugar, and cinnamon is a heavenly combo—it’ll legit make your neighbors jealous!”

Cost
Rating: 4 out of 5 stars
This simple dessert can be made for under $10 if you have some basic ingredients on hand (like the flour, cinnamon, and baking powder). It makes a lot of servings, so you and your friends could easily have a satisfying treat without a lot of prep or cleanup—or just freeze the leftovers.

Convenience
Rating: 5 out of 5 stars
It might sound complicated, but crepes are actually super simple and practical to make. From start to finish, you might need 15 minutes at the most. And if you have a good nonstick omelet pan, it’s even easier. Plus, I love that it’s so versatile—once you learn the basic crepe recipe, the possibilities are endless for fillings.

Taste
Rating: 5 out of 5 stars
You can never go wrong with apples, brown sugar, and cinnamon, especially in the fall. The crepe was light but satisfying; the apples were sweet and just crunchy enough. The apples were a great break from the popular pumpkin flavor.

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